How to Make a Good Impression When Starting a New Job

It’s the first day of work at your dream job, and you want to make a lasting good impression. You wear your favorite suit, get a stylish haircut, and grab a cup of coffee for energy. That’s a great start, but here are more tips for making a favorable impression on that all-important first day.

Arrive early.

Scout out the parking area ahead of time so you can get a convenient parking spot without being late. Allow time for a restroom stop to check your hair and straighten your collar. Head into your work area a couple minutes early to be ready at starting time. That also means staying until quitting time and not leaving early.

Wear a smile.

Look pleasant and cheerful. Be friendly and try to remember the names of associates you met during the interview. Introduce yourself to those you don’t know with whom you will work. Avoid expressing negative emotions although it’s fine to request assistance.

Be a good listener.

The first few days are a steep learning curve for most new employees. Be prepared to listen carefully, ask questions, and take notes. Ask someone to repeat a sentence if you did not clearly hear or understand it. Even if you are criticized for a mistake, be willing to hear what is said and learn from it.

Go the extra mile.

Without becoming a doormat, offer a friendly helping hand to someone in need. If you can manage it, stay a few minutes late or assist a coworker if your work is caught up. Being perceived as helpful and supportive is an attribute prized by many employers.

Practice during downtime.

During breaks or lunchtime, practice new skills to get the hang of it. This might include working with new technology or equipment, or reviewing department records. In medical transcription, for example, simply retyping existing records helps new employees to become familiar with terminology and format.

Ask for help.

If a quick question doesn’t get the answer you need, don’t hesitate to request a brief meeting for additional information. Schedule it at the coworker’s or supervisor’s convenience, possibly after work or during lunch. Have your questions or concerns ready to take as little time as possible while allowing adequate time to discuss.

It’s fairly easy to make a good impression when you get a new job. Just act as though you’re happy to be there and be as productive as possible, and you should fit in just fine.

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